Browse Items (263 total)

  • Collection: World War I Stereoscopic Views

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-001.jpg
The section of white cylinder in the fore-ground is what is left of a German machine gun shelter. The top has been knocked off by a direct hit. Our soldiers called these shelters "Pill Boxes", and had a wholesome respect for them. They were made of…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-002.jpg
August 13th, 1914, was a memorable day for this historic and picturesque old French city. On that day, for the first time in the memory of living men, British soldiers, traditional enemies of France, landed on its quays and marched through its…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-003.jpg
After the Germans were defeated on the Marne in 1914 they did everything consistent with a hasty retreat, to hamper the pursuing French. In this case they have wrecked a railway bridge to cut what would otherwise be the route of the supply trains for…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-004.jpg
Raymond Poincare (pwan'ka'ra'), President of the French Republic, and Joseph JofFrench (zho’fr'), Marshall of France and Commander-in-Chief of its armies, are here on a visit to the front during the great battle of the Somme, which began on July…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-005.jpg
Nowhere on the Western front was there more terrible fighting or more utter desolation of a once lovely countryside than on the plateau lying northeast of Soissons, which has come to be known in history as the Chemin de Dames. "Scarred beyond…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-006.jpg
Look as carefully as you can over this field of desolation and carnage and you will find hardly an inch of ground that has not been blasted over and over again by explosive shells. Those stumps, the remains of a beautiful orchard, show what kind of…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-007.jpg
Looking southwest from the front of the ancient Cloth Hall across the Grand' Place of Ypres, we have here before us for all time to come a vivid glimpse of war as it actually was during four long years in that old Flemish city. Ypres was once a…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-008.jpg
Somewhere in the distance the Germans are scanning the plain, trying to determine just where these sturdy Scotsmen are and how many of them there may be, but the scene that greets their eyes is just as monotonous, just as desolate and devoid of life…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-009.jpg
This terrible war, started by Germany in her mad lust for empire, abounded in situations which tried men's souls to the limit and called for the exertion of every ounce of courage and resolution they possessed. This was one of those occasions. In the…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-010.jpg
A column of fours, as far as the eye can reach, nothing but Germans, muddy, sullen, and harmless, for they are prisoners, the result of a day's fighting. Some of them still wear their heavy steel trench helmets, others have the round gray caps with a…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-011.jpg
These men were in a Serbian dugout on the side of a mountain, cleverly screened as well as protected by heavy stones upon the roof. An observer in an enemy plane would not be apt to suspect the existence of this shelter. A telephone wire ran from…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-012.jpg
Human suffering breaks down many barriers. Here we see the French "fraternizing with the enemy." Fritz and Hans are receiving the same Frenche and impartial treatment that would be given to the wounded of their own ranks. No prisoners of war were…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-013.jpg
This was a scene of almost daily occurrence during the Great War. France suffered terribly. Hundreds of villages were completely blotted out. Literally scarce one stone left standing upon another. None can comprehend how complete the destruction save…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-014.jpg
The painstaking care of the Germans is evidenced in this stone and steel defense which they erected to ward off the attacks of the Allies. Those horizontal lines on the sides of the wall are the marks of the boards with which the Germans built the…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-015.jpg
This is one of the largest cannon used by our army during the Great War, a wonderful piece of mechanism composed of many parts made and adjusted with the utmost care. The recoil, although absorbed by mechanical means, is so tremendous that the gun…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-016.jpg
Artillery played a most important part in all the major operations of the western front. As the war continued this branch of the army grew steadily in strength, efficiency and importance. Both sides possessed terrific weapons but on the whole the…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-017.jpg
Seeing such an encampment as this helps us to realize the extensive service rendered by dogs in the World War. Their aid was invaluable in numerous capacities. Being both intelligent and courageous they could be trained and depended upon to act as…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-018.jpg
Many of our boys who crossed the sea during the World War will recall hours spent in a hut like the one before us. Hundreds of them were scattered over France, in the back areas, where men were being trained for the front. As a rule these huts were…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-019.jpg
A scene such as this helps us to realize how disease and pestilence would naturally follow in the wake of an army unless the sanitary corps is sufficiently strong to clear the ground from day to day. Where this could not be done whole regions would…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-020.jpg
These Germans, having been made prisoners by the Allies, are being used to clean up the old, old city of Chateau-Thierry which their guns ruined. Early in the summer of 1918 the fifth of the great German offensives commenced along the Chemin des…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-021.jpg
This is one of the hundreds of villages caught in the storm of war that swept over Northern France but a few years ago. The villagers returning to their homes after the deluge was over, found but the mass of ruins we see. What had once been home,…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-022.jpg
Verdun (ver' dun') lies in the eastern part of France, about twenty-five miles from the German border. It was a great fortress, one of a series of strongholds constructed to protect France from invasion by Germany. How well it performed this…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-023.jpg
This glimpse around shattered Verdun shows nothing but desolation. The cloud of smoke in the sky is the tell-tale of a shrapnel shell that has exploded over some point behind the lines, where the Germans thought there were troops. Verdun is a very…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-024.jpg
The foreground looks peaceful enough in the bright sunshine of this July day, but in the woods beyond an inferno is roaring. Shells are tearing great craters in the brown earth, flinging showers of dirt and rock to every side ; trees are crashing to…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-025.jpg
It seems like a city of the dead, this once fair French village, a city of days gone by, a replica of the ruins of Pompeii or the timeworn temples of Greece, exposed to modern eyes by the pick of the explorer. Not a living soul is visible, not a sign…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-026.jpg
Men face to face with death feel the need of religion as they feel it at no other time. The shadowy Beyond with its great uncertainties lies just around the corner. Soldiers on the battle field surrounded by the tremendous destructive agencies of…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-027.jpg
If you had no conception of the strength of the weapons that are used in modern warfare you might think that this once peaceful plain had been tossed about by the titanic forces of an earthquake. But all this desolation and destructiveness is the…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-028.jpg
Malines, one of the most charming towns of Belgium, undefended, was bombarded several times, apparently in a spirit of pure malice. On one of those occasions a hundred shrapnel shells exploded in the town. The church of Notre Dame was damaged, great…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-029.jpg
Soissons, spread out along the sloping banks of the Aisne, peaceful, and beautiful with its magnificent cathedrals, its parks, schools and busy industrial life is before you, in ruins. Early in 1915 the first German shell came hurtling through the…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-030.jpg
It was in this dense tangle of trees and underbrush, slashed by storms of machine gun and rifle bullets and uprooted by shells, that the gallant Marine Brigade, of the 2nd Division, fought for a month and earned immortal glory for its name. Here…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-031.jpg
Every day and sometimes twice a day, even on a homeward bound ship such as we are looking at here, the men were assembled for "abandon ship" drill, or, as it was more grimly called in the war days when they were eastward bound, "submarine drill." The…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-032.jpg
As far as your eyes can see these doughboys of the 139th Infantry are trying to get all the necessary things into a regulation and symmetrical bundle that Uncle Sam's officers term a "pack." These two men nearest you have completed rolling the…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-033.jpg
This lonely grave on a broad plain hard by the little village of Chamery, near the city of Reims, in France, will ever be sacred to American young manhood because it contains the remains of one who embodied in his own person to an eminent degree…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-034.jpg
This hospital ward was one of ten separate and complete hospital organizations that made up Debarkation and Convalescent Hospital Number 5, at the Grand Central Palace, New York City. It normally accommodated over 3,400 patients. There is evidence on…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-035.jpg
It is an inspiring reflection that these sturdy, well-groomed soldiers of the "Mid-West" Division, trained by Major General Leonard Wood and seasoned in victorious battle under the leadership of General William M. Wright in the St. Mihiel operation…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-036.jpg
The commanding general of the A. E. F., General John J. Pershing, is pinning on the tunics of these boys the ribboned medals that are their reward for courage and valor on the field of battle. At the left of the General is one of his aides with a…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-037.jpg
Vallendar is a small village on the right bank of the Rhine, about six kilometers from Koblenz. After the armistice it was for a while the headquarters of the 23rd infantry, U. S. Regulars, which fought so brilliantly at Chateau-Thierry and Soissons.…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-038.jpg
Army tractors such as this were used to haul heavy artillery and long trains of supply wagons over the roads of France and Germany. They could jog along at a lively rate, and no load seemed too heavy for them. It was no unusual sight to see one…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-039.jpg
Half a dozen or more sturdy tugs are needed to nose this great steamship in and out of her berth alongside a pier because of her huge size. Those ropes running from her bow lead to other tugs besides those that you can see at her side, all necessary…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-040.jpg
Almost any soldier who looked on this deck full of sick soldiers would remark in no uncertain terms, "That ship is headed for the U. S. A." He would know from a dozen little details in the clothing of the men and from the habits that their appearance…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-041.jpg
No ocean trip is so tiresome as that on which one returns from a foreign land. A certain novelty attends the outward voyage, but the return is all too slow. One longs for the familiar sights and the familiar comforts of home. For our boys, packed as…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-042.jpg
These colored veterans of the great war on their proud march up Fifth Avenue are receiving the acclaim which their services in France merited. In these closely organized ranks are dozens of men who are wearing decorations of The United States, French…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-043.jpg
These hundreds of men in their slickers and web belts have passed through the rigorous routine of the embarkation camp which is located two or three miles beyond that high wall in the distance and are now tramping for the last time down the principal…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-044.jpg
The New York at the opening of the present war was one of the battleships of the Atlantic Fleet in charge of Admiral Henry T. Mayo and was in the outer line of defense. This battleship was built in 1911 at a cost of $6,400,-o8o. It has a displacement…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-045.jpg
The bugler on a battleship is a very busy man. He opens the day with the “first call of reveille” at 5:45, followed by the “reveille” at 5:50 after which comes “turn to.” Then comes the “recall.” After any call which brings the men…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-046.jpg
At nine o'clock every morning, the men assemble for inspection. As at this time everyone must appear in clean whites, and may be called out at any other time of the day to appear in like manner, each sailor usually has one suit in process of drying…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-047.jpg
Each sailor is expected to keep his clothing in good repair. Perhaps when he is sewing up a rent in his trousers or darning his socks he appreciates more than ever before the nimble fingers and loving heart of mother at home. It is needless to say…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-048.jpg
Most of the important naval battles of the war occurred in the North Sea, which washes the coasts of both England and Germany. The storms which often sweep the North Sea, its Frenchquent fogs and rains, make it a disagreeable and dangerous body of…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-049.jpg
Among the many terrible things used for the first time in the great World War, the airplanes and submarines attracted the most notice. On February 4, 1915, the German government proclaimed a war zone about the British Isles and declared its intention…

https://repository.erc.monash.edu/files/upload/Rare-Books/Stereographs/WWI/Keystone/kvc-050.jpg
On May 14, 1917, the United States set in motion a plan for swiftly enlarging the size of the military forces of the nation ; namely, the opening of training camps for officers for the new National Army. Three months of intensive training were…